15 + Things People With Depression Want You To Know

15 + Things People With Depression Want You To KnowAs a person who has been depressed for most of my life, I know first hand how upsetting these misconceptions are. We need to stop stigmatizing mental illnesses. You see depression has many faces, and those who battle with it go through different experiences. Not one story is alike. There needs to be compassion and understanding. The following list are things I wish family and friends understood:

  1. We don’t always need a reason to feel depressed.
  2. Stop saying: “just deal with it.” You see depression isn’t something you can “just deal” with. It is something we are constantly working on, and many times we need a hand.
  3. Living with depression doesn’t make us weak. It actually makes us strong, because fighting the monsters in our head every day means inner strength.
  4. Men can suffer from depression as well. Please stop generalizing that women only go through it. Men have feelings and emotions too you know.
  5. Depression isn’t being moody.
  6. We can feel drained, even after sleeping all day. It doesn’t matter if we sleep too little or too much. No amount of sleep can take the exhaustion we feel go away.
  7. We may or may not need meds, every case is different.
  8. 15 + Things People With Depression Want You To KnowWe can get depressed during winter.
  9. We are trying our best to get through the day.
  10. Depression isn’t about us feeling sorry for ourselves. We actually get mad and feel stuck for feeling this way.
  11. Don’t tell us: “our problems could be so much worse. We know there are many people out there in worse situations, but saying that doesn’t help. It makes us not want to tell you how we feel anymore.
  12. Depression and sadness aren’t the same thing.
  13. We’re no lazy, we’re exhausted.
  14. Just because I am smiling and socializing doesn’t mean I’m not depressed
  15. 15 + Things People With Depression Want You To KnowEven the rich and famous get depressed.
  16. Depression isn’t a choice.
  17. We can have happy moments, even when depressed. Just because we go out and have fun with friends, doesn’t mean our depression went away.
  18. We’ve tried many things to bring ourselves out of depression.
  19. Getting out of bed in the morning is hard and sometimes impossible.
  20. Exercising, eating healthy and drinking water is only PART of a solution.
  21. Depression can cause physical pain too! It isn’t just mental.
  22. We don’t mean to ditch you, we tend to isolate yourselves.
  23. We’re not faking it! It’s not for attention.

Have you also been told these things? What are other things you have been told when depressed? Let me know in the comment section below.

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  1. I have been told by somebody i know that “all teenagers are depressed, and those who make it a big deal are over reacting because they want to feel special”

  2. “You don’t look depressed!”

    “You have everything. How can you be depressed?”

    Like honestly, I don’t look depressed because I’m so anxious that if I don’t dress myself up, I will feel uncomfortable and out of place and if have to go home to make myself feel better.

    Just because I have lots of things doesnt mean that I cUt be depressed. I DON’T have everything, I feel a good in my life. I don’t have happiness. I don’t have mental stability. Just by looking at me, you can’t determine if I’m depressed or not. Looks can be deceiving.

    I also don’t “look” depressed because I push myself to smile and to interact with people. I push myself to fake happiness or ignore triggering comments to get through the day. Its hard!! I keep myself from crying in public because I don’t want pity, either.

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